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Eileen Berenyi

Eileen Berenyi

Eileen Berenyi Governmental Advisory Associates

EILEEN BERENYI

Founder and President, Governmental Advisory Associates

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Dr. Eileen Berenyi is the Founder and President of Governmental Advisory Associates and a Research Associate of the Earth Engineering Center, Columbia University. In 2008, she published her research (updated in 2009) on recycling rates and waste-to-energy data from all across the United States by the name Recycling and Waste-to-Energy: Are They Compatible?. Her most recent publication is Nationwide Economic Benefits of the Waste-to-Energy Sector.

Contributions


December 7, 2013 from our Articles, The 2013 Global Dialogue on Waste
This panel addressed the role of waste-to-energy (if any) in the waste management hierarchy of North America and Europe, provided international experience on the degree of compatibility between recycling and waste-to-energy, analyses the arguments for the juxtaposition of waste-to-energy and recycling, and discusses the policies adopted in some communities to build successful sustainable waste management systems, with the general aim of moving away from landfills.Read More




November 19, 2013 from our The 2013 Global Dialogue on Waste, Video Excerpts
The major reason why you see higher recycling rates in areas with waste-to-energy compared to those that don't is basically the state and local policy environment. To just make the decision to move to waste-to-energy facility there has to be a lot of studies of feasibility, including understanding the waste stream, thinking through what the different streams of waste you have. How can you best maximize those streams? The kind of planning that goes into this type of a facility really engages the whole gamut of the waste management stream. So, those localities, and solid waste districts that have sited or are looking at moving to waste-to-energy as one part of their waste disposal strategy are also engaged in an integrated waste policy initiative.Read More




November 19, 2013 from our The 2013 Global Dialogue on Waste, Video Excerpts
In the last 15 years, waste-to-energy as the percentage of waste generated has come down. Starting from 19% in 1995 down to about 12% of the waste now. So, we've actually gone backwards in terms of waste-to-energy. Recycling has gone up, from about 25% to about 34% from 1995. But that's not a huge increase either in 15 years! If you add these two rates, the waste that's converted to energy and waste that's recovered by recycling hasn't changed in the last 15 years. We're still landfilling about 54-55% of waste.Read More




November 9, 2013 from our The 2013 Global Dialogue on Waste, Video Excerpts
Waste-to-Energy is a strategy that many cities with dense population, have issues with landfilling, and want to decrease waste transportation distances are using and continue to look at. Waste-to-energy is also a technology that has been evolving over the years and there are many new developments in this technology, moving in mainly one direction - to be able to applied to smaller size waste streams. Not only is it a strategy that has real importance for the current public policy, it is a strategy that will definitely present itself to additional areas.Read More




June 5, 2013 from our The 2013 Global Dialogue on Waste, Video Panels

Click here to read the full length article based on this panel

Recycling and/or Waste-to-Energy is probably one of the most controversial topics in ... Read More




 

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